Iron Chef Morimoto opens MOMOSAN Ramen in Wynwood

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Iron Chef Morimoto opens MOMOSAN Ramen in Wynwood

MOMOSAN

Iron Chef, Masaharu Morimoto, has unveiled his latest addition, MOMOSAN, to Miami’s burgeoning palate pleasing options. the beloved restaurant that has been a local hidden gem and go-to dining destination in the Grove for the last 10 years.

His already popular ramen eatery Momosan Ramen & Sake (415 NW 26th Street) is located in Wynwood. The restaurant opened its doors on Friday, December 18, marking the restaurant’s fourth location in the U.S.
You may have guessed it by its namesake, Momosan, specializes in ramen showcasing varieties like tonkotsu ramen, tokyo chicken, tantan, or tsukemen. The menu is complemented by a variety of grilled dishes and Japanese bar snacks like duck tacos, pan-fried pork gyoza, crispy pig ears, soft shell bao, sticky ribs, spicy wonton in Szechuan sesame chili sauce, and duck fat French fries. WIth options like these you won’t have to leave the Magic city to experience some of Japans most popular bar foods. For the more Miami-centic foodie, savory options like roast duck and A5 Wagyu beef complete the menu.

With a beverage menu featuring a large sake list, including a selection of Morimoto’s own sake and wine, Japanese whiskey, cocktails, draft and bottled beer including Morimoto beers in collaboration with Rogue Ales.

It should be noted, this isn’t Morimoto’s first introduction into Miami’s food landscape. In 2014 he opened his namesake Morimoto restaurant in the Shelbourne Hotel, unfortunately the location closed just after a year of opening its doors. Morimoto’s is poised to become a staple in the fabric of foodie culture in Wynwood.

Momo san, a moniker for Chef Morimoto (Morimoto san shortened to Momo san) is not only a brand new concept, but also signifies the formal and formidable entrance of Morimoto into the world of ramen.While Momosan Ramen & Sake is his first ramen shop, Momo san himself is no stranger to the cuisine. Having grown up and honed his skills in Japan, where ramen is a staple dish, Morimoto developed an early love for noodles. Bowls of ramen have been on Morimoto’s menus across the country since 2001, well before the so-called “ramen boom” began in New York City.

Momosan Tonkotsu Tonkotsu, a ramen broth, which originated in the Kyushu region of Japan, is traditionally made up of nearly 100% pork bones that are boiled for twenty plus hours. Kyushu style tonkotsu is extremely pungent, with a thick consistency, and typically white in color. Thin, round noodles are used, so that the noodles are able to fully absorb the flavor of the strong soup. Momosan tonkotsu steers away from the traditional Kyushu style, offering a soup that is more approachable, but still delivers on richness, strength and flavor.

A combination of 70% pork bones and 30% chicken bones are boiled for twelve to fourteen hours, resulting in tonkotsu that is darker in color, with less pungency, and a smoother consistency. Momosan noodles are classified as “temomi” noodles (translating literally to hand massage), which have both thinner and thicker segments to help grab onto the soup while slurped. The noodles are slightly thicker than classic tonkotsu style, and flat, allowing them to float at the top, rather than sink to the bottom. Additionally, the noodles are aged, adding an extra layer of deep flavor and umami.

At Momosan, Chef Morimoto brings his favorite food and drink from his home in Hiroshima, Japan to his adopted home in New York City. Noodles are front and center on the ramen focused menu, and are paired with playful takes on authentic Japanese comfort food and delicious sake.Momosan Ramen & Sake offers the chance at a casual, slurp-filled Morimoto experience, without losing the Iron Chef quality guests all over the globe have come to expect.

Momosan Tonkotsu, a ramen broth, which originated in the Kyushu region of Japan, is traditionally made up of nearly 100% pork bones that are boiled for twenty plus hours. Kyushu style tonkotsu is extremely pungent, with a thick consistency, and typically white in color. Thin, round noodles are used, so that the noodles are able to fully absorb the flavor of the strong soup.

Momosan tonkotsu steers away from the traditional Kyushu style, offering a soup that is more approachable, but still delivers on richness, strength and flavor. A combination of 70% pork bones and 30% chicken bones are boiled for twelve to fourteen hours, resulting in tonkotsu that is darker in color, with less pungency, and a smoother consistency. Momosan noodles are classified as “temomi” noodles (translating literally to hand massage), which have both thinner and thicker segments to help grab onto the soup while slurped. The noodles are slightly thicker than classic tonkotsu style, and flat, allowing them to float at the top, rather than sink to the bottom. Additionally, the noodles are aged, adding an extra layer of deep flavor and umami.

Momosan is located at 415 NW 26th Street Miami, FL 33127

Reservations can be made via OpenTable.